Tag Archives: 3.5 stars

Book Review: Kiss Me in New York by Catherine Rider

Kiss me in new york

Kiss Me in New York

Release date: October 3rd 2017

3.5 stars

It’s Christmas Eve at JFK in NYC.
Charlotte is a British student, waiting for a flight home after the worst semester of her life. Anthony is a native New Yorker, surprising his girlfriend at the airport after three months apart. Charlotte has just been dumped, and Anthony is about to be dumped, right in the middle of the holiday crowd.
Charlotte’s flight is canceled when a blizzard blows in, and Anthony can’t bear to go home. So, they set out into the city together, clutching a book Charlotte picks up in the airport gift shop: Ten Easy Steps for Getting Over Your Ex. For this one night, they’ll focus on healing their broken hearts … together.
Step-by-step, the two struggle to put the past behind them. But the snow is so enchanting, and the holiday lights are so beguiling, that soon their shared misery gives way to something else. Soon, they’re not only over their exes — they’re falling for each other.
Then a subway ride splits them up by mistake. Will they reunite before Charlotte’s flight leaves New York forever?

This was a very fast, very cute read. It’s perfect for curling up with on a cold night, hot chocolate in hand, snuggled up with a blanket, and just letting it warm you up. It took place pretty much within a twenty-four hour period and had our two main characters, total strangers, bonding over their respective break-ups. I loved the idea of them teaming up to have one night of following the steps in the book Get Over Your Ex in Ten Easy Steps and it made for a book that was cute, heart-warming, and made me smile.

The book was told alternating between Charlotte’s POV and Anthony’s POV. Charlotte was a British exchange student who’s flight home for Christmas was cancelled. She had just been dumped by her boyfriend and was eager to get home, away from all the reminders. I really liked Charlotte, she was pretty rational but she could also be impulsive, and while I would probably never have the courage to ask a stranger to do the steps in a Get Over Your Ex book with me, she made it seem perfectly acceptable. Anthony wanted to surprise his girlfriend at the airport when she arrived but ended up getting dumped instead. He was more reluctant to get involved in Charlotte’s plan with his break-up being more fresh but he eventually agrees to go along with her plan. It was better than wandering the streets alone because he didn’t want to go home and face his family, who thought he was spending the night with his girlfriend.

The plot was mostly Charlotte and Anthony getting to know each other while doing the steps in the book. They had to improvise on a few of them but they made it work. The connection between them maybe happened a little fast but I could also understand it, both heart-broken and alone on the holidays and finding someone who understands what they were going through formed a bond. If they’d met under any other circumstances they might not have even given each other a second look but everything that night worked to form a bond between them.

As mentioned, it was a fast read at about 200 pages, but it was one that put a smile on my face and i really enjoyed it.

*I received a copy of this book from Indigo Books & Music in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: Rules of Rain by Leah Scheier

Rules of Rain

Rules of Rain

Release date: December 5th 2017

3.5 stars

A dramatic new novel about the bond between a teen and her twin brother.
Rain has taken care of Ethan all of her life. Before she even knew what autism meant, she’s been her twin brother’s connection to the hostile world around him. She’s always prepared—when her father abandons them, when her mother gets sick, when Ethan is tortured by bullies from school—Rain is the reliable, stable one holding them all together. She’s both cautious carer and mad chef, preparing customized meals for her family and posting crazy recipes on her cooking blog.
Each day with Ethan is unvarying and predictable, and she’s sure that nothing will ever change—until one night when her world is turned upside down by a mistake she can’t take back. As her new romance with her long-time crush and her carefully constructed life begins to unravel, she discovers that the fragile brother whom she’s always protected has grown into a young man who no longer needs her. And now, for the first time, she finds that she needs him.

I wasn’t too sure what to expect going in to this book but it turned out to be a quick, cute read that had some great supporting characters and some very good character growth for the main character. There were interesting family dynamics, romance, and amazing friendships. I really liked Rain’s blog entries with her food suggestions and Ethan’s experiments.

Rain started the book as someone who pretty much lived to take care of her brother. As he started to become more independent, she struggled with losing her own sense of self. Who was she if she wasn’t her brother’s caregiver? That, and trusting other people with her brother, were something she was struggled with the whole book and had to learn to let go. The relationship she had with her brother was sweet but also could be a little co-dependent.

The romance was sweet, though sometimes Liam did seem a little too perfect. The friendships were a huge highlight and I would definitely read a spin-off featuring either Ethan and Hope or Marcus and Kathy. I was surprised at how invested I got into their stories considering they weren’t the main focus. I loved the way the group interacted with each other. They seemed like they would be a lot of fun to hang out with.

The plot was very character focused so if the reader didn’t like Rain, it might be hard to enjoy the book. It was quick to read and I got way more invested than I first expected.

*I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: Brooding YA Hero by Carrie Ann DiRisio

Brooding YA Hero

Brooding YA Hero: Becoming a Main Character Almost as Awesome As Me

Release date: October 3rd 2017

3.5 stars

 

Have you ever wished you could receive a little guidance from your favorite book boyfriend? Ever dreamed of being the Chosen One in a YA novel? Want to know all the secrets of surviving the dreaded plot twist?
Or maybe you’re just really confused about what “opal-tinted, luminous cerulean orbs” actually are?
Well, popular Twitter personality @broodingYAhero is here to help as he tackles the final frontier in his media dominance: writing a book. Join Broody McHottiepants as he attempts to pen Brooding YA Hero: Becoming a Main Character (Almost) as Awesome as Me, a “self-help” guide (with activities–you always need activities) that lovingly pokes fun at the YA tropes that we roll our eyes at, but secretly love.
As his nefarious ex, Blondie DeMeani, attempts to thwart him at every turn, Broody overcomes to detail, among other topics, how to choose your genre, how to keep your love interest engaged (while maintaining lead character status), his secret formula for guaranteed love triangle success, and how to make sure you secure that sequel, all while keeping his hair perfectly coiffed and never breaking a sweat.

This book was hilarious, poked fun at some more popular tropes in YA books, but also had a lot of great writing tips. The book was told mostly through Broody’s POV with some additions from his ex-girlfriend Blondie, teaching the reader how to become a main character. He talked about the different types of characters, plots, settings in a way that made sense but was also funny.

Broody was used to being in many, many books so when he was suddenly not the one being chosen to star in books, he decided to write his own. It was full of reasons why he was the most awesome character ever while being like a self-help guide to supporting or new characters to becoming a main character in their own right. His guide delivered hilarious commentary on so many tropes, pointing out flaws without being insulting. I loved that there was actual writing advice within Broody’s narration.

I really liked the addition of Blondie DeMeanie’s narration, interjected in between Broody’s Broody-centric advice. She was tired of being cast in the role of villain simply because she liked make-up or because she was Broody’s ex-girlfriend. She just wanted to be the main character for once. She often added her own advice or broadened Broody’s thoughts.

It was a quick read that had many, many laugh out loud moments. Broody showed some character growth as he went through trying to figure out how to write his book. This book definitely made me want to check out Broody’s twitter account for more laughs and awesomeness.

*I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: Kat and Meg Conquer the World by Anna Priemaza

Kat and Meg

Kat and Meg Conquer the World

Release date: November 7th 2017

3.5 stars

Kat and Meg couldn’t be more different. Kat’s anxiety makes it hard for her to talk to people. Meg hates being alone, but her ADHD keeps pushing people away. But when the two girls are thrown together for a year-long science project, they discover they do have one thing in common: They’re both obsessed with the same online gaming star and his hilarious videos.
It might be the beginning of a beautiful friendship—if they don’t kill each other first.

This book was a quick read with great moments of female friendship and both main characters showing a lot of growth. I enjoyed the way their love of a video game and YouTube star brought them together. They were such complete opposites but they worked well as friends, first more as a convenience since neither really had any friends and then as someone they could trust. It stayed pretty light but still tackled some issues like mental illness(anxiety, panic attacks, and ADHD).

Kat was the one I found myself identifying with more than Meg. Kat was new, quiet, and getting paired with Meg for a science project was a huge nightmare. She was the type of student who would rather work by herself and know she would get a good grade than chance her partner bringing her down. Meg was more outgoing, very open with her love for Lumberlegs, and wasn’t the most reliable when it came to schoolwork. Her antics drove Kat crazy but she also pushed Kat to try new things so they balanced each other very well.

I enjoyed the YouTube/Lumberlegs plot line. Both girls loved watching the YouTube star Lumberlegs playing a video game, one that Kat also loved to play and Meg was learning to play. It was relevant to today with so many YouTube stars making names for themselves. It was nice to see their love of the video game tie into their science project, which was another major plot of the book. The science project was their big assignment for the year and was a big source of disagreement between the two girls due to their difference of work ethics.

The plot was predictable but enjoyable. It was fast to read and I will definitely be looking for more books from this author in the future.

*I received a copy of this book from Indigo Books & Music in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: The Color Project by Sierra Abrams

The Color Project

The Color Project

Release date: August 17th 2017

3.5 stars

Bernice Aurora Wescott has one thing she doesn’t want anyone to know: her name. That is, until Bee meets Levi, the local golden boy who runs a charity organization called The Color Project.
Levi is not at all shy about attempting to guess Bee’s real name; his persistence is one of the many reasons why Bee falls for him. But while Levi is everything she never knew she needed, giving up her name would feel like a stamp on forever. And that terrifies her.
When unexpected news of an illness in the family drains Bee’s summer of everything bright, she is pushed to the breaking point. Losing herself in The Color Project—a world of weddings, funerals, cancer patients, and hopeful families that the charity funds—is no longer enough. Bee must hold up the weight of her family, but to do that, she needs Levi. She’ll have to give up her name and let him in completely or lose the best thing that’s ever happened to her.

This book had made its way on to my must read list a while ago and once I had it in my hands, it didn’t take me long to settle in to read it. I really enjoyed the friendships, family dynamics, the relationship between Bee and Levi, and the whole concept of The Color Project. It’s the type of book that can make the reader want to go out and get involved the way these characters did. I also really liked all the scenes that involved Bee at her job at a florist’s, especially once she began designing her own arrangements.

Beatrice, Bee, was the second oldest in a family of four and I found she was a very easy character to relate to. When she found a project she believed in, she threw herself into it, like with The Color Project. She loved her family, sometimes they could annoy her, but when they needed to pull together or comfort each other, they were there. She had some great friendships with Gretchen, her best friend who had recently moved, with some of her brother’s friends, and new friendships with some of the workers at The Color Project. She went by her nickname, Bee, instead of her full name and only a few people even knew her full name. I liked that Levi made a game out of guessing her name. It was cute and playful.

The relationship between Bee and Levi was a huge part of the story so I was glad I enjoyed it. There was an immediately attraction and interest between them but it was a slow developing relationship. They were good for each other and I thought it was a believable relationship with the issues that ended up appearing, like the big one from the synopsis with Bee not wanting to reveal her full name. There were times when I wanted to yell at them to just talk to each other and to actually listen to what the other was saying, but it showed that as cute as they were together, they were not immune to having problems in their relationship.

There was a few times the book felt a little long. From the synopsis, I knew there would be an illness in Bee’s family but it seemed to take forever for it to be revealed. I think I was about halfway through the book before that storyline took place. It did make me feel like the story was dragged out a bit, even with all the cute interactions between characters(which I am always a fan of). I did find the plot easy to predict but the character dynamics did their best to make up for it.

*I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: Click’d by Tamara Ireland Stone

Click'd

Click’d

Release date: September 5th 2017

3.5 stars

Allie Navarro can’t wait to show her best friends the app she built at CodeGirls summer camp. CLICK’D pairs users based on common interests and sends them on a fun (and occasionally rule-breaking) scavenger hunt to find each other. And it’s a hit. By the second day of school, everyone is talking about CLICK’D.
Watching her app go viral is amazing. Leaderboards are filling up! Everyone’s making new friends. And with all the data Allie is collecting, she has an even better shot at beating her archenemy, Nathan, at the upcoming youth coding competition. But when Allie discovers a glitch that threatens to expose everyone’s secrets, she has to figure out how to make things right, even if that means sharing the computer lab with Nathan. Can Allie fix her app, stop it from doing any more damage, and win back the friends it hurt-all before she steps on stage to present CLICK’D to the judges?

I really loved Every Last Word, which dealt with the world of poetry, so I was really excited to see how Tamara Ireland Stone would handle the world of technology and apps. As this is a middle grade novel, I thought the author did a great job using the world of app development and the technology required in a way that felt realistic but without getting too detailed to overwhelm the reader. It was really great to see a middle grade book with a female character focused on coding and friendships. The writing was beautiful in a way I’ve come to expect for Tamara Ireland Stone and, while it was a short, quick read it still had a good message.

Allie was a young character, only twelve years old, so I thought it was understandable that she could be a little selfish and immature. She got caught up in the hype surrounding the app she designed and didn’t want to admit to her parents when there were glitches. Asking for help and taking responsibility for mistakes is a huge part of growing up and it was something Allie slowly did through the book.

I really liked the dynamics in the relationships Allie had with her friends, her parents, and her nemesis. The book was short so the turnaround between Allie and Nathan going from enemies to friends felt a little rushed and it would have been nice to see it fleshed out just a bit more, but overall it was really good.

I also liked the whole idea for the app. The scavenger hunt aspect of it sounded like a lot of fun and it’s always fun to find people you have something in common with and make new friends. The glitch in the app sounded like a legitimate problem that could easily happen, one that could end up being an app-killer if not solved. It also led to some good questions being raised about privacy on the internet and could create some good discussions.

*I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: The Art of Feeling by Laura Tims

Art of Feeling

The Art of Feeling

Release date: August 15th 2017

3.5 stars

Since the car accident, Samantha Herring has been in pain, not only from her leg injury, but also from her mother’s death, which has devastated her family. After pushing away her friends, Sam has receded into a fog of depression.
But then Sam meets Eliot, a reckless loner with an attitude and an amazing secret—he can’t feel any pain. At first, Sam is jealous. But then she learns more about his medical condition…and his self-destructive tendencies. In fact, Eliot doesn’t seem to care about anything at all—except maybe Sam. As they grow closer, they begin to confront Sam’s painful memories of the accident—memories that may hold a startling truth about what really happened that day.

This book ended up being a quicker read than I’d originally thought it would considering it was dealing with a family grieving and attempting to move on with their lives after the death of the mother of the family. It also dealt with a boy who couldn’t feel pain and how the teenage daughter from the family and the boy became friends. They were helping each other in ways no one else could. Both teens had interesting family dynamics. Both family fought quite often but they also very obviously did care about each other.

Sam was a likeable character. She struggled with the fact that she’d been in the car with her mother during the crash and has been unable to remember any details about the other car or person who took off. She’d pushed away all her friends during her time out of school right after the accident and was finding it hard to connect with them again when she returned. That led her to becoming friends with Eliot, who both intrigued and frustrated her with his lack of self-preservation. Their dynamics was really interesting and I loved seeing their friendship unfolding.

Sam’s family were all struggling with their grief in their own ways. Her father lost his soulmate, her brother was self-medicating his pain away, and her sister simply stayed away as much as she could. Eliot and his older brother had a very interesting dynamic. His older brother was his primary guarding because their parents were never around. Eliot resented his brother trying to be a parent and his older brother struggled with balancing letting Eliot have independence and making sure he was safe.

Other than these two characters’ developing friendship and Sam’s struggle with her grief, we had some side plots of Eliot being bullied, both of them caught up in being targeted by a childhood friend of Sam’s who was trying to rebuild his image as a tough drug dealer, and the mystery of who was in the other car that hit Sam and her mother. None of them felt too overwhelming and they all tied nicely into the main plot. I thought the author did a good job making sure everything connected.

*I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart

Genuine Fraud

Genuine Fraud

Release date:

3.5 stars

The story of a young woman whose diabolical smarts are her ticket into a charmed life. But how many times can someone reinvent themselves? You be the judge. Imogen is a runaway heiress, an orphan, a cook, and a cheat.
Jule is a fighter, a social chameleon, and an athlete.
An intense friendship. A disappearance. A murder, or maybe two.
A bad romance, or maybe three.
Blunt objects, disguises, blood, and chocolate. The American dream, superheroes, spies, and villains.
A girl who refuses to give people what they want from her.
A girl who refuses to be the person she once was.

I was excited for this book since I enjoyed We Were Liars and this seemed like it could be a good mystery with a twist type of a read. I liked the non-linear storytelling, flashbacks showing the friendship between the two girls and how things escalated to the point where they ended up, and seeing Jule in the present. The characters felt like they were love them or hate them type of characters and I liked some and disliked others.

The novel was very character driven. Jule, the main character, was definitely sketchy in the morals department and had me questioning if I could trust her narrative. That made her interesting and made me want to learn more about her. The supporting cast wasn’t as strong and with less than 300 pages not too many of them got to show a lot of growth.

The main focus was on Jule and the mystery surrounding her. The book was inspired by The Talented Mr Ripley and I definitely saw similarities, to the point where I wasn’t too surprised in regards to a lot of the supposed suspenseful twists. It actually took away a lot of the suspense for me. I do think it’s a book that can be enjoyed by mystery lovers, E. Lockhart fans, and more, it just didn’t grab me in the ways I was hoping it would.

*I received a copy of this book from Indigo Books & Music in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: The Glass Spare by Lauren DeStefano

Glass Spare

The Glass Spare

Release date: October 24th 2017

3.5 stars

Wil Heidle, the only daughter of the king of the world’s wealthiest nation, has grown up in the shadows. Kept hidden from the world in order to serve as a spy for her father—whose obsession with building his empire is causing a war—Wil wants nothing more than to explore the world beyond her kingdom, if only her father would give her the chance.
Until one night Wil is attacked, and she discovers a dangerous secret. Her touch turns people into gemstone. At first Wil is horrified—but as she tests its limits, she’s drawn more and more to the strange and volatile ability. When it leads to tragedy, Wil is forced to face the destructive power within her and finally leave her home to seek the truth and a cure.
But finding the key to her redemption puts her in the path of a cursed prince who has his own ideas for what to do with her power.
With a world on the brink of war and a power of ultimate destruction, can Wil find a way to help the kingdom that’s turned its back on her, or will she betray her past and her family forever?

The synopsis of this book reminded me a lot of Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi. It was a bit of a steampunk/fantasy hybrid plot and had some very interesting sibling dynamics that I really enjoyed. They felt so realistic, coming from someone with siblings. The characters and the relationships between them were definitely the best parts of the book for me. The plot was interesting, though there were a few times I found it a little predictable.

Wil, our main character, was a “spare”, a child of the King who was not the heir. I liked that instead of turning against each other, she and two of her siblings were very close. There were times I got vibes of the “Always and Forever” bond of the siblings from The Originals. The discovery of her powers changed things for her and added a new dynamic to the story by introducing Loom, a prince from a rival kingdom. There did seem to be a bit of instalove between them but it wasn’t enough for me not to feel like they could work together.

I am hoping for more world-building in the next book. There was some in this one but it felt very incomplete and left me with some questions. The world-building and predictability has been where I’ve struggled in past Lauren DeStefano books but I am being hopeful for this one. I enjoyed what we got from this first one and it is a very intriguing set-up.

Overall, I enjoyed this first book in her new series and am very hopeful that I will continue to enjoy the rest, when they come out in way too long from now.

*I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Book Review: Internet Famous by Danika Stone

Internet Famous

Internet Famous

3.5 stars

High school senior and internet sensation Madison Nakama seems to have it all: a happy family, good grades, and a massive online following for her pop-culture blog. But when her mother suddenly abandons the family, Madi finds herself struggling to keep up with all of her commitments.
Fandom to the rescue! As her online fans band together to help, an online/offline flirtation sparks with Laurent, a French exchange student. Their internet romance—played out in the comments section of her MadLibs blog—attracts the attention of an internet troll who threatens the separation of Madi’s real and online personas. With her carefully constructed life unraveling, Madi must uncover the hacker’s identity before he can do any more damage, or risk losing the people she loves the most… Laurent included.

The first thing that I loved about this book was that Starveil, first mentioned and loved in All the Feels, played a role in this book as well. It wasn’t as big, in All the Feels the main character was a huge fan of Starveil and in Internet Famous the main character was a fan but it didn’t play as big a role in her life as it did with the girl from All the Feels. Where All the Feels showed the more positive side of a fandom coming together, Internet Famous showed the negative side with trolling and bullying.

Madi was a character who had a lot of responsibility, which ended up giving her a lot of freedom. She attended her high school’s online version so she could be available to help with her little sister, who had autism and needed to stick to her routine. It meant Madi was free to run her blog where she would do live watches of shows and movies, having fun blogging about her thoughts on them. She became friends with Laurent and was slowly coming out of her comfort zone when the troll started to attack.

A lot of the supporting cast outside of Madi’s family were her online friends. No one besides Laurents really got a whole lot of development but it made sense to show how supportive online friends can be without having to know a lot of personal information. I would have liked to have seen her family a bit more but it was another thing that made sense with the plot. Madi wasn’t big on sharing her blog with anyone except her sister and even then, she was pulling away from her a little to find out who she was.

I liked the way the troll aspect was handled. It felt very realistic. It started small, easy to ignore but still left Madi a little shaken since the person was invading her safe space. The cyberbullying escalated and the effects on Madi were obvious. It was when the mood shifted from a lighter read to something more serious. It tackled a very real issue with a relatable character and I just wanted the cyberbully to be exposed.

*I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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